Health Protocols


  • Please Remember: Do not come to school or work when you are awaiting results of a COVID-19 test. 

    Carroll ISD will lift COVID-19 safety protocols, mask mandates, contact tracing and quarantine requirements beginning June 1, 2021.

    Symptoms of COVID-19
    People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms. Some experience no symptoms, while others have mild to moderate symptoms that can escalate to a severe, life-threatening illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with the following symptoms may have COVID-19, as outlined in the Texas Education Agency and Tarrant County Public Health guidelines:

    • Feeling feverish or a temperature greater than or equal to 100.0 degrees Fahrenheit
    • Sore throat
    • New uncontrolled cough that causes difficulty breathing
    • Diarrhea
    • Vomiting
    • Abdominal pain
    • Abnormal taste and smell
    • New onset of severe headache
    • Shortness of breath
    • Fatigue
    • Chills with exaggerated shaking or shivering
    • Significant muscle pain or ache
    • Nausea
    • Congestion or runny nose

    Individuals with COVID-19 Like Symptoms
    A student who has recently begun to experience any of the above COVID-19 like illness symptoms in a way that is not normal for them should:

    1. Isolate at home
    2. Avoid unnecessary contact with others
    3. Monitor for worsening symptoms
    4. Contact their physician for further guidance if necessary

    Your school nurse or other designated person will provide ongoing communication and assistance with determining when your child may safely return to school. In accordance with the TEA/TCPH guidelines, a student who has COVID-19 like symptoms may return to school after all 3 of the following criteria have been met:

    1. At least 24 hours have passed since resolution of 100 fever without the use of fever-reducing medications
    2. The individual has improvement in symptoms; and
    3. At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

    IF a student has been sent home with COVID-19 like symptoms or the parent reports their child is home with COVID-19 like symptoms and they want to return to school before completing the above criteria, the individual must either:

    1. Obtain a medical professional’s note clearing the individual for return based on an alternative diagnosis or
    2. Obtain an acute infection test at an approved testing location that comes back negative for COVID-19; an antibody test is not acceptable.

    Individuals Who Test Positive for COVID-19
    If a student receives a positive test result for COVID-19, the student should:

    1. Isolate at home;
    2. Avoid any unnecessary contact with others;
    3. Follow the treatment plan/instructions provided by their healthcare practitioner;
    4. Notify the school that the student tested positive for COVID-19.

    Your school nurse and/or other designated school representative will contact you to determine when your student can safely return to school as well as gather additional information required to determine whether other individuals at school have been exposed to COVID-19.

    A student who tests positive for COVID-19 may return to school once the following 3 criteria have been met:

    1. At least 24 hours have passed since resolution of 100 fever without the use of fever-reducing medications
    2. The individual has improvement in symptoms; and
    3. At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

    If a student tested positive for COVID-19 but does not exhibit any symptoms of illness, they may return to school 10 days from the date they were tested.  It is important to note that once a student receives a positive COVID-19 test result, any subsequent  negative COVID-19 test result or a positive antibody test will not shorten the minimum 10-day isolation period. 

    According to the CDC, once a person has tested positive for COVID-19 and recovered from the illness, they do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to 3 months as long as they do not develop symptoms again. This implies that a student cannot become a close contact to a COVID-19 positive person within 90 days of their COVID-19 illness. People who develop symptoms again within 3 months of their first bout of COVID-19 may need to be tested again if there is no other cause identified for their symptoms. 

    Individuals Who Are Designated as a Close Contact
    In accordance with TEA, a student is designated as a close contact to someone with COVID-19 if they have been:

    1. Directly exposed to infectious secretions (e.g., being coughed or sneezed upon); or
    2. Within 6 feet of an infected person for a cumulative duration of 15 minutes during their infectious period which is the 2 days prior to the onset of COVID-19 symptoms to 10 days after symptoms onset. In the case of an asymptomatic COVID-19 positive individual, the infectious period is 2 days prior to the confirming lab test and continuing 10 days following the confirming lab test.

    If a student is determined to be a close contact to a person who tested positive for COVID-19, they are required to do the following:

    • Quarantine at home;
    • Monitor for symptoms of COVID-19
    • Stay home for 10 days after the last date of exposure to the infected person;
    • Contact their physician if they develop any symptoms of illness.

    Because an individual exposed to COVID-19 may become infectious at any time within 10 days of their last exposure, a negative COVID-19 test during their quarantine will not reduce the required 10 day quarantine. A student who does not show any symptoms of COVID-19 during their quarantine may return to school after 10 days. A staff member must provide a negative COVID-19 result or doctor's release in order to return to work as scheduled after close contact/exposure. It is highly recommended to test on day 7 after last exposure. 

    Vaccinated persons with an exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 are not required to quarantine if they meet all the following criteria:

    • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., ≥2 weeks following receipt of the second dose in a 2-dose series, or ≥2 weeks following receipt of one dose of a single-dose vaccine)
    • Are within 3 months following receipt of the last dose in the series
    • Have remained asymptomatic since the current COVID-19 exposure

    Returning to School After Travel
    Interstate and international travel is quite common for families over extended school breaks. At present the TEA, CDC and TCPH guidelines do not require students to quarantine at home before returning to school after travel outside the State of Texas or the United States. For specific guidelines on what to do after traveling outside of the Country, visit the CDC Travel Webpage at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/after-travel-precautions.html

    Key Definitions

    Quarantine: Quarantine keeps someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps prevent the spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with COVID-19 without feeling symptoms. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and notify their physician if they begin to show any signs of illness. Symptoms of COVID-19 may appear within 2 to 14 days after the last exposure to the virus. For this reason, a person who is under quarantine must stay home for 10 days after the last date of exposure. A negative COVID-19 test result will not reduce the required 10 day quarantine period.

    Isolation: Isolation keeps someone who is infected with COVID-19 away from others, even those in their home. People who are in isolation should stay home except to get medical care and follow the CDC recommendations:

    • Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately
    • Stay in a separate room from other household members, if possible
    • Use a separate bathroom, if possible
    • Avoid contact with other members of the household and pets
    • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils
    • Wear a mask when around other people, if you are able to.

    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) & Masks 

    UPDATED 7.7.20: Schools are required to comply with the Governor's Executive Order regarding the wearing of masks. In addition to the executive order, school systems may require the use of masks or face shields for adults or students for whom it is developmentally appropriate. Schools MUST require students, teachers, and staff to wear masks or face shields as they arrange themselves in positions (entering/exiting buildings, walking to/from classrooms in the hallway, etc.) that will allow them to maintain safe distancing.

    • Some CISD staff may be wearing PPE, to include face coverings, masks or shields as needed.
    • Desk dividers/shields may be used by elementary students as necessary in classrooms to protect/divide students in close proximity to other students. Masks should be worn by students age 10 and above in compliance with Governor Greg Abbott's Executive Order.
    • The Texas Education Agency recently announced that PPE would be purchased and provided to each district for use as needed. 
      From the state, Carroll ISD will receive:
      • 76,088 disposable masks
      • 19,022 reusable masks
      • 33,524 gloves
      • 63 thermometers
      • 895 gallons of hand sanitizer
      • 986 adult face shields

    Why wear a mask?
    Masks are recommended as a simple barrier to help prevent respiratory droplets from traveling into the air and onto other people when the person wearing the mask coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice. This is called source control. This recommendation is based on what we know about the role respiratory droplets play in the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, paired with emerging evidence from clinical and laboratory studies that shows masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth. COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet), so the use of masks is particularly important in settings where people are close to each other or where social distancing is difficult to maintain, in the school setting, for example.  Moreover, Governor Greg Abbott’s Executive Order GA 29 acknowledges that medical experts are consistently encouraging people to use face coverings as one of the most important and effective tools for reducing the spread of COVID-19.

    Who should wear a mask?
    In accordance with CDC recommendations and Tarrant County Public Health, all students ages  or below must wear a cloth face covering while at school. In addition, the Texas Education Agency Guidelines state that school systems may require the use of masks or face shields for adults or students for whom it is developmentally appropriate. Schools MUST require students age 9 or below, teachers, and staff to wear masks or face shields as they arrange themselves in positions (entering/exiting buildings, walking to/from classrooms in the hallways, for example) that will allow them to maintain safe distancing. 

    When is it OK to remove a mask?
    The removal of cloth face coverings is permitted under the following circumstances:

    • Desk dividers/shields may be used by elementary students as necessary in classrooms to protect/divide students in close proximity to other students. Students 9 years old and younger may remove masks once they are behind their desk divider shield in the classroom. Desk shields are now optional.
    • Students participating in PE classes or athletic workouts may remove masks as long as they remain more than six feet away from others. Because social distancing at recess cannot be enforced, students are asked to wear comfortable, disposable masks while at recess.
    • Teachers/students may use a face shield or remove their mask if they are presenting/speaking and maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet from others.

    When is it permissible NOT to wear a mask?
    While masks are strongly encouraged to reduce the spread of COVID-19, CDC recognizes that wearing masks may not be possible in every situation or for some people. In some situations, wearing a mask may exacerbate a physical or mental health condition, lead to a medical emergency, or introduce significant safety concerns. For students and staff who have a medical or mental health condition that makes it difficult to wear a face mask, a face shield should be considered.  Because there is currently not enough evidence to support the effectiveness of face shields as a protection of others from the spray of respiratory droplets from the face shield wearer, the CDC does not currently recommend use of face shields as a substitute for masks.  But for those staff and students who must wear a face shield instead of a mask, the available data suggests that face shields that wrap around the sides of the wearer’s face and extend below the chin or hooded face shields may provide better source control than others.

    What if my child has a medical condition or disability?
    If a student or staff member is not able to wear a cloth face mask due to a medical condition or disability, they are advised to wear a face shield.  For those who cannot wear a face mask or face shield, a note from their doctor should be submitted to the school nurse that specifically describes the medical condition or disability that prevents the student/staff member from complying with the face covering requirement.  Once a note from the doctor has been received, the school nurse will forward it to the school counselor who will either amend the student’s existing 504 plan to reflect the accommodation or will initiate the 504 process for students who do not have a 504 plan in place. The student will be required to wear a mask or face shield until the 504 plan is amended to reflect the new accommodation or a new 504 plan is implemented.